Governance and Public Policy in Canada: A View from the Provinces

Governance and Public Policy in Canada: A View from the Provinces

Weight 0.00 lbs
By Michael M. Atkinson, Daniel Béland, Gregory P. Marchildon, Kathleen McNutt, Peter W.B. Phillips, and Ken Rasmussen
University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division © 2013
World Rights
208 Pages
Paper
ISBN 9781442604933
Published Jun 2013
$29.95
Cloth
ISBN 9781442607668
Published Jun 2013
$67.00
ebook (EPUB format)
ISBN 9781442604957
Published Jun 2013
Full purchase $23.95
Description
Author
Contents
Reviews

Governance and Public Policy in Canada lays the foundation for a systematic analysis of policy developments, shaped as they are by multiple players, institutional tensions, and governance legacies. Arguing that provinces are now the most central site of governance and policy innovation, the book assesses the role of the provinces and places the provincial state in its broader economic, institutional, social, and territorial context. The aim throughout is to highlight the crucial role of provinces in policy changes that directly affect the lives of citizens.

Three key themes unify this book. First, it addresses the role of policy convergence and divergence among provinces. Although the analysis acknowledges enduring differences in political culture and institutions, it also points to patterns of policy diffusion and convergence in specific areas in a number of provinces. Second, the book explores the push and pull between centralization and decentralization in Canada as it affects intergovernmental relations. Third, it underscores that although the provinces play a greater role in policy development than ever before, they now face a growing tension between their expanding policy ambitions and their capacity to develop, fund, implement, manage, and evaluate policy programs. Governance and Public Policy in Canada describes how the provincial state has adapted in the context of these changing circumstances to transcend its limited capacity while engaging with a growing number of civil society actors, policy networks, and intergovernmental bodies.

Michael M. Atkinson, Daniel Béland, Gregory P. Marchildon, Kathleen McNutt, Peter W.B. Phillips, and Ken Rasmussen are all with the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the Universities of Saskatchewan and Regina.
List of Figures and Tables
Preface

Introduction

1. Intergovernmentalism and Provincial Policy Setting
2. Provincial Administrative Institutions
3. Taxing and Spending
4. The Provincial Regulatory State
5. Civil Society, Policy Networks, and the Production of Expertise

Conclusion

References
Index
Always important players in their own right and on the national stage, provincial governments in Canada have arguably never received the detailed comparative treatment they deserve. This short book by a leading group of public policy scholars provides a succinct overview and introduction to provincial governments and is outstanding in its scope and coverage, ranging from traditional fiscal policy concerns to digital governance. For both practitioners and students it will no doubt serve as the single best introduction to the subject for years to come.

Michael Howlett, Simon Fraser University

Governance and Public Policy in Canada provides an institutional context for the study of public policy in the provinces. It is an important point in a re-orientation of public policy to the sub-national level. The multi-level governance perspective allows for the inclusion of provinces, civil society organizations, local governments, policy networks, and First Nations in an effort to better understand the increasingly complex world of policy making. With this book the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy has established itself as a leading centre for policy analysis in Canada.

Canadian Public Administration

Overall this book has few shortcomings. It is a good contemporary analysis of the state of public policy in the provinces. The structure may be best suited to an undergraduate reader, but that is no impediment to a decent read.

David M. Brock, Northern Public Policy Book Review Forum