Small Business and the City: The Transformative Potential of Small Scale Entrepreneurship

Small Business and the City: The Transformative Potential of Small Scale Entrepreneurship

Weight 0.00 lbs
By Rafael Gomez, Andre Isakov, and Matthew Semansky
Rotman-UTP Publishing
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division © 2015
World Rights
312 Pages 10 Images
Paper
ISBN 9781442612099
Published Feb 2015
Online discount: 25%
 $29.95    $22.46
Cloth
ISBN 9781442643628
Published Feb 2015
Online discount: 25%
 $70.00    $52.50
ebook (EPUB format)
ISBN 9781442696518
Published Feb 2015
Online discount: 27%
Full purchase $29.95
  $21.95
Description
Author
Contents
Reviews

In Small Business and the City, Rafael Gomez, Andre Isakov, and Matt Semansky highlight the power of small-scale entrepreneurship to transform local neighbourhoods and the cities they inhabit. Studying the factors which enable small businesses to survive and thrive, they highlight the success of a Canadian concept which has spread worldwide: the Business Improvement Area (BIA). BIAs allow small-scale entrepreneurs to pool their resources with like-minded businesses, becoming sources of urban rejuvenation, magnets for human talent, and incubators for local innovation in cities around the globe.

Small Business and the City also analyses the policies necessary to support this urban vitality, describing how cities can encourage and support locally owned independent businesses. An inspiring account of the dynamism of urban life, Small Business and the City introduces a new “main street agenda” for the twenty-first century city.

Rafael Gomez is an associate professor of Employment Relations at Woodsworth College and the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources at the University of Toronto.

Andre Isakov is currently the Manager of Park Planning and Design with the City of Coquitlam, British Columbia. Previously, he was the Community and Economic Development Officer for the Village of Harrison Hot Springs and the Executive Director of Business Improvement Areas of British Columbia (BIABC).

Matt Semansky is an award-winning journalist based in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. His work has appeared in publications such as This Magazine, the National Post, The Halifax Chronicle Herald, The Coast, and Marketing.

Foreword, by Michael Thompson
Acknowledgments

  1. Introduction: Small Business and City Life

Part I: The View from Main Street

  1. The BIA Movement: Setting the Stage for Main Street Revitalization
  2. The View from Main Street Halifax: The Challenge of Being the Big Fish in a Small Pond
  3. The View from Main Street Vancouver: A City Region with an Emerging Sense of Place
  4. The View from Main Street Toronto: The Bottom-Up, Top-Down Conundrum

Part II: Unlocking the Potential of Small-Scale Enterprise

  1. The “Art and Science” of Small Business Survival: Lessons in BIA Practice
  2. Of People, Profits, and Place: Lessons in Local Economic Development
  3. Small Business and the Main Street Agenda: Lessons in Public Policy
  4. Recommendations for Making Small-Scale Enterprise a Transformative Force
  5. Conclusion: Cities, Small Business, and Distributed Decision Making

Afterword: Or … Why Staying Small, Local, and Independent Matters to City Life

About the Authors
Notes
References
Index

“A most useful book, especially for the city planner, urban geographer, and anyone who cares about the future of cities.  Relevant case analyses are embedded in a coherent structure that provides practical examples of past successes and failures as well as sensible policy recommendations for the future.  Highly recommended.”

David K. Foot, Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics, University of Toronto, and author of 'Boom, Bust & Echo: How to Profit from the Coming Demographic Shift'

Small Business and the City is a plea for a ‘small is beautiful’ approach to business, urban scale, and public sector decision-making. Gomez, Isakov, and Semansky’s evocative descriptions of Business Improvement Areas teach far more about BIAs, their operations, and the thinking of their members than do tables of statistics on these organizations.”

Pierre Filion, Professor, School of Planning, University of Waterloo

“Each atomistic transaction between a small business and a customer provides the flare for a rich economic eruption, encompassing spillovers and interactions with other firms, citizens, and the built environment. This book offers a bold explanation of how cities can succeed by nurturing and harnessing these powerful interactions to create dynamic communities and growing economies.”

Kevin Milligan, Associate Professor, Vancouver School of Economics, University of British Columbia