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Publishing with UTP Higher Education

UTP Higher Education is a publisher of academic texts. Our books are primarily used for undergraduate college and university courses in history and the social sciences. We also have a modest trade and library presence.

Guidelines for Submitting Proposals

Proposal Format

Proposals should be between 3 and 8 pages long and should include the following:

  1. Description of and rationale for the proposed whole, including a table of contents.
  2. Discussion of the ways in which the project speaks to current teaching practices and scholarly interests.
    • What are the challenges in teaching the content of related courses? How does the proposed text speak to these challenges?
    • Is the treatment of the subject matter expansive, conceptual, or practical?
    • Is it at the cutting edge or a better restatement of existing knowledge?
    • What distinctive approaches to coverage of specific topics will your project offer?
    • Are there topics that others in the field may expect to find but which you will not include? Why not?
  3. Discussion of the project's potential market.
    • What is the primary market for the project?
    • What are the secondary markets for the project?
  4. If primary sources are included, discussion of relevant textual and translation issues.
  5. Overview of competing or complementary books.
  6. Proposed date of completion.
  7. Tentative title.
  8. Estimated total length of the manuscript (approximate word count, if possible).
  9. List of non-textual items (charts, graphs, illustrations).
  10. Proposer's CV.

Proposals should be sent as email attachments (preferably in MS Word).

Contact UTP Higher Education acquisition editors

Download our Marketing and Publicity Guidelines for Authors for more information on how we will market and sell your book.

Proposals may also be directed specifically toward the following series published by UTP Higher Education:

History Series:

International Themes and Issues

The Canadian Historical Association is the editor of this new series. Each volume will be a concise, focused, comprehensive overview of a topic or issue that is of international significance and broad interest in the study of history. Rather than coming from a single national viewpoint, the approach is comparative. Page count is 150-200 pages. Please contact

Readings in Medieval Civilizations and Cultures

These readers are born of a desire for a richer, multi-layered approach to the social, political, religious, economic, and intellectual history of the middle ages. The series seeks to provide students and scholars with collections of translated primary sources, including many to which they would not normally or easily have access. Each volume contains a mixture of standard documents (those which are central to the field and without which the volumes would be incomplete) and representative texts (those which are often less known and yet reveal important and interesting aspects of the Middle Ages). Both period and thematic readers are included. The series editor is Paul Edward Dutton.

Companions to Medieval Studies

This series consists of relatively short books of 100-125 pages designed to serve several functions:

a. To act as general introductions to important medieval subjects covered in many college and university undergraduate classrooms.
b. To accompany and complement the source books that appear in the Readings in Medieval Civilizations and Cultures Series.
c. To act as handy reference books on a topic as students and instructors make their way through courses on the subject (whether or not they are using the relevant reader).

The series editor is Paul Edward Dutton.

Rethinking the Middle Ages

Rethinking the Middle Ages is committed to re-examining the medieval era, its themes, institutions, people, and events. These are short studies, overviews of a particular topic or theme that provoke discussion among students and scholars, inviting them to think about the problems and issues of the Middle Ages in new and unusual ways. The series editors are Paul Edward Dutton and John Shinners.

Social Sciences Series:

Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom

The Teaching Culture Series offers an opportunity to take a road less travelled in academic publishing. The series offers book-length ethnographies that are conceived of, and developed especially for, undergraduate use. We seek manuscripts that reflect current scholarship and speak to pedagogical needs, but that differ from traditional scholarly monographs in a number of ways:

1. Audience: Our goal with the series is to produce exciting and accessible ethnographies that draw upon original research and engage with important issues in anthropology in ways that appeal to undergraduate students with no prior exposure to the discipline. While books in the series are also appropriate for specialized upper-year courses, writing for introductory students requires anticipating the knowledge, experience, and motivations that attract students into anthropology in the first place.

2. Format/Organization: While accessibility is an important criterion, so too is the format/organization of the book. Anticipating how the proposed book might work in introductory courses of varying sizes and thematic emphases entails creative experimentation with the arrangement of chapters and data. Think about ways that you might fit your proposed book into your own introductory courses. Perhaps you might organize the chapters to follow a more general sequence of topics, focus upon a particular key segment, and/or build around a story arc or theme that recurs throughout the semester or quarter.

3. Length: Think short, then go shorter. We are looking for manuscripts in the 40,000-50,000 word range, resulting in a published book of 125-150 pages. This makes the readings manageable to students and easier for instructors to integrate into their teaching.

4. Writing Style/Tone: Ethnographies in this series employ a personal narrative voice while privileging ethnographic data, characters, and narrative over exposition of theory and trendy jargon. Our authors don’t “write down” to students, but create works that engage their imaginations and intellects—books that teach, through example, the fascinating and important contributions anthropologists make to the exploration of human experience.

5. Extending the Text: Ethnographies in this series may also integrate various media to support and extend their impact and usefulness as pedagogical tools. While we aim for books that can act as stand-alone publications, thinking about the role of photographs, films, video, social media, and other supplements is important, and can lend further creative thinking about how to use ethnography as a teaching tool.

The series editor is John Barker, University of British Columbia.

Anthropological Insights

The Anthropological Insights Series features short books (80 to 100 pages or 35,000 to 50,000 words) that provide instructors and students with foundational information about key topics and ethnographic regions that are covered in many undergraduate classrooms. Competitively priced, the books can accompany and complement more comprehensive textbooks, readers, and ethnographies. They can also stand on their own as handy reference works or serve as the main component in class modules.

We invite your suggestions for topics. Possibilities include topical overview of:

  • Addiction
  • Biotechnology
  • Contemporary Witchcraft
  • Death
  • Ecotourism
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Indigeneity
  • Language Risk/Revitalization
  • Museum Anthropology
  • Photography
  • Policing
  • Posthumanism
  • Queer Culture
  • Social Media

We are also interested in regional guides to the anthropology of:

  • Russia, East Africa, Melanesia, Japan, etc. 

Authors are encouraged to think creatively about the organization of the proposed book, while ensuring that the following elements are included:

  • An accessible overview of the subject
  • A summary of current directions of research
  • A guide to key publications/resources
  • Suggested topics for student research and papers

Proposal Format:

Proposals should be between 5 and 15 pages long and include the following:

1. Description of and rationale for the proposed whole, including an annotated table of contents.

  • What is it about this topic that would lend itself well to the series format and approach?

2. Discussion of the ways in which the project speaks to current teaching practices and scholarly interests.

  • Where is the subject matter located in terms of current scholarly interests. Is it cutting edge? Is it a popular subject? Is it a topic that requires a revisit in light of current research? Is it a topic that has not yet been translated for a student audience?
  • What are the challenges in teaching the content of related courses? How does the proposed text speak to these challenges?
  • What distinctive approaches to coverage will your project offer?
  • Are there elements that others in the field may expect to find but which you will not include? Why not?

3. Discussion of the project's potential market.

  • What is the primary course market for the project?
  • What are the secondary markets for the project?

4. If you intend to include non-textual materials or primary documents (e.g. illustrations, charts, tables, etc.) please explain the role these materials will play in the text and how you will treat them in the text as well as any potential copyright issues.

5. Overview of competing or complementary books, explaining how the proposed project differentiates itself.

6. Proposed date of completion.

7. Tentative title.

8. Estimated total length of the manuscript (approximate word count, if possible).

9. Proposer's CV.