Studies in Book and Print Culture


Book history has proven to be an exciting and dynamic meeting ground for a range of ideas and methodological approaches. Historians, literary scholars, librarians, bibliographers, and others have all begun to discuss the historical circumstances of literary production and reception, examining not only those who wrote and read, but those who produced, distributed, and sold books and print materials, as well as the physical objects themselves. Studies in Book and Print Culture is international and interdisciplinary in scope. The series includes studies of literary history, historical bibliography, textual editing, studies of authorship and publishing, and analyses of reading, literacy, and print culture.

General Editor: Leslie Howsam, Department of History, University of Windsor
Advisory Board: James Raven, Faculty of Modern History, Oxford University Sydney Shep, Wai-te-ata Press, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

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Elizabethan Book Publishing and the Makings of Literary Culture
Elizabethan Book Publishing and the Makings of Literary Culture
By Kirk Melnikoff

Outlining the full range of practises that publishers performed, including the acquisition of copy and titles, compiling, alteration to texts, and reissuing, Elizabethan Publishing and the Makings of Literary Culture considers links between the book trade and the literary culture of Elizabethan England.

Available Mar 2018
American Little Magazines of the Fin de Siecle: Art, Protest, and Cultural Transformation
American Little Magazines of the Fin de Siecle: Art, Protest, and Cultural Transformation
By Kirsten MacLeod

In American Little Magazines of the Fin de Siecle, Kirsten MacLeod examines the rise of a new print media form – the little magazine – and its relationship to the transformation of American cultural life at the turn of the twentieth century.

Available Jan 2018
The Prison of Love: Romance, Translation, and the Book in the Sixteenth Century
The Prison of Love: Romance, Translation, and the Book in the Sixteenth Century
By Emily C. Francomano

In The Prison of Love, Emily Francomano offers the first comparative study of this sixteenth-century work as a transcultural, humanist fiction.

Available Dec 2017
Victorian Jesus: J.R. Seeley, Religion, and the Cultural Significance of Anonymity
Victorian Jesus: J.R. Seeley, Religion, and the Cultural Significance of Anonymity
By Ian Hesketh

Victorian Jesus explores the relationship between historian J. R. Seeley and his publisher Alexander Macmillan as they sought to keep Seeley’s authorship a secret while also trying to exploit the public interest.

Available Nov 2017
Preserving on Paper: Seventeenth-Century Englishwomen's Receipt Books
Preserving on Paper: Seventeenth-Century Englishwomen's Receipt Books
Edited by Kristine Kowalchuk
Preserving on Paper is a critical edition of three seventeenth-century receipt books–handwritten manuals that included a combination of culinary recipes, medical remedies, and household tips which documented the work of women at home.
Published Jun 2017
Print Culture Histories Beyond the Metropolis
Print Culture Histories Beyond the Metropolis
Edited by James J. Connolly, Patrick Collier, Frank Felsenstein, Kenneth R. Hall, and Robert G. Hall

Print Culture Histories Beyond the Metropolis focuses attention to how the residents of smaller cities, provincial districts, rural settings, and colonial outposts have produced, disseminated, and read print materials.

Published Mar 2016
New Canadian Library: The Ross-McClelland Years, 1952-1978
New Canadian Library: The Ross-McClelland Years, 1952-1978
By Janet Friskney

To place the New Canadian Library in its proper historical context, Friskney examines the simultaneous development of Canadian literary studies as a legitimate area of research and teaching in academe and acknowledges the NCL as a milestone in Canadian publishing history.

Published Apr 2015
Bookrolls and Scribes in Oxyrhynchus
Bookrolls and Scribes in Oxyrhynchus
By William A. Johnson

Close analysis of formal and conventional features of the bookrolls not only provides detailed information on the bookroll industry- but also, in turn, suggests some intriguing questions and provisional answers about the ways in which the use and function of the bookroll among ancient readers may differ from modern or medieval practice.

Published Oct 2013
The New Bibliopolis: French Book Collectors and the Culture of Print, 1880-1914
The New Bibliopolis: French Book Collectors and the Culture of Print, 1880-1914
By Willa Z. Silverman

The New Bibliopolis is an important contribution to the study of book history, French sociocultural history, and fine and decorative arts.

Published May 2013
The Hidden History of South Africa's Book and Reading Cultures
The Hidden History of South Africa's Book and Reading Cultures
By Archie L. Dick

Through this innovative methodology, Dick aptly shows how South African readers used reading and books to resist unjust regimes and build community across South Africa's class and racial barriers.

Published Mar 2013