Trends Project

The Trends Project Series is a result of the Government of Canada's Policy Research Initiative, an undertaking that seeks to strengthen the Government of Canada's policy capacity and ensure that policy development benefits from the work of researchers and academics. The Policy Research Initiative, in cooperation with the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, undertook a new model for academics and government to collaborate on policy research. Teams of academics examined the forces that are driving change in Canada and identified the potential implications for public policy. This collaboration came to be known as the Trends Project. Under the Project, academics, research institutes, and government officials worked in partnership to build a better knowledge base on longer-term issues to support policy development and identify knowledge gaps requiring further research.


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Aging and Demographic Change in Canadian Context
Aging and Demographic Change in Canadian Context
David Cheal

Contributors question whether an aging society is necessarily inferior or problematic compared with the recent past, cautioning that exaggerated concerns about population aging can be harmful to rational policy making.

Published Apr 2003
Social Differentiation: Patterns and Processes
Social Differentiation: Patterns and Processes
By Danielle Juteau

By paying special attention to political processes, norms, and representations, and by indicating how social policies shape economic functioning and relate to normative definitions, this book will interest policy-oriented researchers and decision-makers.

Published Feb 2003
Capacity for Choice: Canada in a New North America
Capacity for Choice: Canada in a New North America
By George Hoberg

Examines North American integration and its potential future impact on Canadian life in eight areas: trade, the labour market, the brain drain, macroeconomics, federalism, social welfare, the environment, and culture.

Published Jul 2002
Value Change and Governance in Canada
Value Change and Governance in Canada
By Neil Nevitte

Significant shifts in the dynamics of citizen–state relations have taken place throughout the advanced industrial world over the last two decades. A growing body of evidence suggests that these reorientations are shaped by value changes among publics.

Published May 2002
Governing the Environment: Persistent Challenges, Uncertain Innovations
Governing the Environment: Persistent Challenges, Uncertain Innovations
By Edward A. Parson

This collection of seven essays, authored by leading Canadian academics, examines different aspects of the relationship between government and environmental issues.

Published Nov 2001
Who is Afraid of the State?: Canada in a World of Multiple Centres of Power
Who is Afraid of the State?: Canada in a World of Multiple Centres of Power
Edited by Gordon Scott Smith and Daniel Wolfish

The essays in this collection argue that – contrary to some private-sector populists – the state is in the best position to lead in making policy in a rapidly changing world and should retain and refine this responsibility.

Published Nov 2001